creative south

Creative South: Alice and Pearl

This Creative South article on Savannah maker of retro kitchen accessories for children and parents Alice and Pearl originally appeared in the Summer 2018 issue of Paprika Southern. To see more from this issue including sustainable road trip tips, Palm Springs-inspired summer fashion, a studio visit with artist Lisa D. Watson, and much more, order a copy of the back issue. You can also become a Paprika Southern subscriber so you don’t miss a thing.

Alice and Pearl | Retro Kids Accessories | Parent and Kids Kitchen Accessories | Kids Oven Mitts | Kids Aprons | Vintage Pattern | Vintage Kitchen | Retro Kitchen | Kids Pot Holders | Paprika Southern

Alice and Pearl

Retro Kitchen Accessories for Children and Parents

Written by Bevin Valentine Jalbert / Photographed by Siobhan Egan

Becky Prescott’s handmade business is infused with a vintage aesthetic that also reverberates throughout her appealingly curated home and personal style. The business is Alice and Pearl and Becky, the Savannah, GA-based sole proprietor, makes retro-inspired kitchen accessories for adults and children.

Alice and Pearl | Retro Kids Accessories | Parent and Kids Kitchen Accessories | Kids Oven Mitts | Kids Aprons | Vintage Pattern | Vintage Kitchen | Retro Kitchen | Kids Pot Holders | Paprika Southern
Alice and Pearl | Retro Kids Accessories | Parent and Kids Kitchen Accessories | Kids Oven Mitts | Kids Aprons | Vintage Pattern | Vintage Kitchen | Retro Kitchen | Kids Pot Holders | Women Makers | Women Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern

The aprons, oven mitts, potholders, and, the newest addition to her line, baby bibs ("baprons," as she calls them) are all completely handmade by Becky, using retro-inspired and vintage reproduction fabrics she sources far and wide. The printed patterns are lively, featuring motifs ranging from lemons to rotary phones to astronauts.

When Becky started Alice and Pearl, named after her grandmother and her husband’s grandmother, in 2013, after ten years spent in the food television world, kitchen accessories seemed a natural place to begin. As a child, she had imagined having her own store, and she always wanted to hand-make goods. Owning her own handmade business offers her the best of both those worlds.

Alice and Pearl | Retro Kids Accessories | Parent and Kids Kitchen Accessories | Kids Oven Mitts | Kids Aprons | Vintage Pattern | Vintage Kitchen | Retro Kitchen | Kids Pot Holders | Women Makers | Women Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Alice and Pearl | Retro Kids Accessories | Parent and Kids Kitchen Accessories | Kids Oven Mitts | Kids Aprons | Vintage Pattern | Vintage Kitchen | Retro Kitchen | Kids Pot Holders | Women Makers | Women Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern

When she first started the business, Becky tried a variety of things before focusing in on a retro aesthetic.

“Once I started to narrow it down and realized that was where I should be headed, everything really opened up, and now my whole thing is retro,” she says.

Becky even has a retro camper she takes to craft fairs and pop-up shops that she uses as a backdrop to sell her wares. She credits the evolution of her business to the realization that her brand needed to be authentically her own, gaining a wider following via social media, and the “help and support of small businesses here locally.” Alice and Pearl’s first retailer was a now-closed kitchen shop in downtown Savannah, where Becky also had her first pop-up shops, and she makes all the aprons for the employees at Savannah’s popular Back in the Day Bakery.

Alice and Pearl | Retro Kids Accessories | Parent and Kids Kitchen Accessories | Kids Oven Mitts | Kids Aprons | Vintage Pattern | Vintage Kitchen | Retro Kitchen | Kids Pot Holders | Women Makers | Women Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern

A challenge presented by the retro prints has been representation. While selling at an event, she was approached by an African-American girl wanting an apron, and realized her inventory did not include any prints that featured people of color.

“That really spoke to me that I need to think about that and search for more options. So recently my newest search has been trying to find any kind of fabric that felt retro and had people of color.”

Part of the philosophy behind the goods is the idea of parent-child bonding. Her young daughter inspired her to begin making children’s aprons and play oven mitts, an idea that evolved into matching parent-child sets. The sets encourage children to get excited about being included in the kitchen, and the children’s items have grown into a best-seller.

“I love the idea of a kid cooking with their parent…It’s a teaching thing, but when they’re having so much fun, they don’t even realize they’re being taught in the moment,” she says.

Alice and Pearl | Retro Kids Accessories | Parent and Kids Kitchen Accessories | Kids Oven Mitts | Kids Aprons | Vintage Pattern | Vintage Kitchen | Retro Kitchen | Kids Pot Holders | Women Makers | Women Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Alice and Pearl | Retro Kids Accessories | Parent and Kids Kitchen Accessories | Kids Oven Mitts | Kids Aprons | Vintage Pattern | Vintage Kitchen | Retro Kitchen | Kids Pot Holders | Women Makers | Women Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Alice and Pearl | Retro Kids Accessories | Parent and Kids Kitchen Accessories | Kids Oven Mitts | Kids Aprons | Vintage Pattern | Vintage Kitchen | Retro Kitchen | Kids Pot Holders | Women Makers | Women Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Alice and Pearl | Retro Kids Accessories | Parent and Kids Kitchen Accessories | Kids Oven Mitts | Kids Aprons | Vintage Pattern | Vintage Kitchen | Retro Kitchen | Kids Pot Holders | Women Makers | Women Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern


Creative South: Moss & Marsh

This interview with Candace Brodmann of Moss & Marsh originally appeared in the Winter 2016 issue of Paprika Southern. Since the time of that interview, Candace has moved the Moss & Marsh headquarters to an expanded studio location where she now produces her screen prints in-house. She has added three new prints to her line, including the most recently launched early this year, her Monstera print, and she plans to release an Oysters print this spring. Additionally, there is a home collection in the works, set to to debut June 1. The Moss & Marsh product line is now carried by 24 retailers, spanning geography from Georgia to Alaska, and this summer Candace plans to showcase Moss & Marsh at Americas Mart in Atlanta for the first time. In addition to her own tireless work and dedication, Candace also cites the countless relationships she’s built with other makers and creatives in the community as a vital part of growing a handmade business. Moss & Marsh will celebrate its third anniversary this April.

Candace Brodmann | Moss & Marsh | Maker | Maker Studio | Maker Movement | Artisan | Textiles | Parenting Products | Children’s Products | Kids’ Products | Textiles | Parenting Tips | Parenting Solutions | Parenting Babies | Parenting Toddlers | Savannah, GA | Paprika Southern

Moss & Marsh

Owner: Candace Brodmann, Savannah, GA

Written by Ageda Machuca / Photographed by Siobhan Egan

“It would be great if we had this.” A common phrase both Candace Brodmann and her husband would say often during their first year of parenthood. Like most first-time parents, parenthood brought on many new challenges and sometimes, Candace says, “you [just] figure things out.” 

That is exactly what Candace did. She would head to her sewing room and sew up essential must-have items that she found were necessary for any parent. Eventually this practice led to an assortment of eleven products that would begin her journey as a mom-preneur.

Candace Brodmann | Moss & Marsh | Maker | Maker Studio | Maker Movement | Artisan | Textiles | Parenting Products | Children’s Products | Kids’ Products | Textiles | Parenting Tips | Parenting Solutions | Parenting Babies | Parenting Toddlers | Savannah, GA | Paprika Southern
Candace Brodmann | Moss & Marsh | Maker | Maker Studio | Maker Movement | Artisan | Textiles | Parenting Products | Children’s Products | Kids’ Products | Textiles | Parenting Tips | Parenting Solutions | Parenting Babies | Parenting Toddlers | Savannah, GA | Paprika Southern
Candace Brodmann | Moss & Marsh | Maker | Maker Studio | Maker Movement | Artisan | Textiles | Parenting Products | Children’s Products | Kids’ Products | Textiles | Parenting Tips | Parenting Solutions | Parenting Babies | Parenting Toddlers | Savannah, GA | Paprika Southern

Candace, Founder and Creative Director of Moss & Marsh, graduated from the University of Georgia with a degree in textiles, giving her the foundation that she needed to begin her multi-functional, baby product collection.

From sewing, designing, and printing each product on her own, this mom-preneur has kept the ball going and still manages to juggle all roles. This labor of love process is what gives Moss & Marsh the handmade quality appeal that her customers have come to appreciate with each item. She saw a niche in the community and began product testing at baby showers and with each piece of feedback she would refine her products.

Candace Brodmann | Moss & Marsh | Maker | Maker Studio | Maker Movement | Artisan | Textiles | Parenting Products | Children’s Products | Kids’ Products | Textiles | Parenting Tips | Parenting Solutions | Parenting Babies | Parenting Toddlers | Savannah, GA | Paprika Southern

It’s no wonder that her passion and drive has led to the success of her business. She enjoys what she is doing and is excited to be able to share these functional products with other moms. Although her business just took off in April, website sales have more than doubled in the following months. She shares, “It's really cool how God isn't giving me too much. It's not growing outside my means and that's exciting and I can handle it.” 

Although life as a businesswoman has been filled with sacrifices and challenges, Candace gets excited with every order she receives and it means a lot to her to know that “someone [she doesn’t] know supports [her business].” As for what the future holds, she envisions herself in her own home studio that will employ other stay-at-home moms and possible room for a toddler and even a maternity line. In the end, her goal for Moss and Marsh is to be the go-to business for functional baby products that will make parenting life easier. 

Candace Brodmann | Moss & Marsh | Maker | Maker Studio | Maker Movement | Artisan | Textiles | Parenting Products | Children’s Products | Kids’ Products | Textiles | Parenting Tips | Parenting Solutions | Parenting Babies | Parenting Toddlers | Savannah, GA | Paprika Southern
Candace Brodmann | Moss & Marsh | Maker | Maker Studio | Maker Movement | Artisan | Textiles | Parenting Products | Children’s Products | Kids’ Products | Textiles | Parenting Tips | Parenting Solutions | Parenting Babies | Parenting Toddlers | Savannah, GA | Paprika Southern
 
Winter 2016
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See the full article about Candace Brodmann of Moss & Marsh in print with an order of the Winter 2016 issue of Paprika Southern. This issue also features enchanting winter fashion in a cotton field, recipes designed for winter comfort, an interview with the founders of Brackish Bow Ties, and much more.

Paprika Southern is a quarterly publication dedicated to inspiring creativity and intention in everyday life. In our pages you will find lush visuals and thoughtful writing, as well as a commitment to inclusivity. We offer a curated view of the most innovative creatives, trends and art of the South, and we invite you to join our journey.

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Creative South: Daughter Handwovens

In each issue of Paprika Southern we feature three creatives living and working in the South in our Creative South section. This section is dedicated to highlighting both emerging and established makers, artists, and entrepreneurs who are doing innovative and exciting things in the South.

This article about the creator of Daughter Handwovens, Alexandra Forby, was originally published in the print edition of Paprika Southern Spring 2018. To see the article in print, along with an exploration of the photographic legacy of southern photographer Jack Leigh, our tips on how to begin a lifelong art collection, a spring brunch menu with recipes, and much more, order a back issue of the Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern.

Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern

Daughter Handwovens

Written by Bevin Valentine Jalbert / Photographed by Siobhan Egan

In Alexandra Forby’s Savannah studio, strands of cotton and linen are woven together in intricate patterns to form throw pillows, tea towels, and other handwoven goods. The sound of the 36-inch, four-shaft loom that Alexandra operates resounds in organized cacophony and the process is surprisingly physical.

Weaving is an ancient art, and Alexandra, owner of Daughter Handwovens, loves the tradition it represents.

“So much of this is based in awesome references to weaving in the Bible,” she explains, “and women who work with their hands…Proverbs 31 is a woman who considers a field and buys it. She’s progressing her home. She’s making all of the things for her home.”

Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
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Proverbs 31 also serves as the inspiration for the name of her business. After graduating from Savannah College of Art and Design in 2013 with a BFA in painting, Alexandra, who had always dabbled in fibers art, eventually found her way to weaving, starting Daughter Handwovens in 2016. Though the business is young her work has been well-received at craft fairs and on Etsy, and over the 2017 holiday season she sold every scarf she made.

The hand-weaving process requires patience. It takes two days to set up the loom for a project. Though she can do multiple pieces once the loom is set up, a scarf, for example, takes about four hours to weave.

Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern

The ancient nature of weaving, as well as its tradition as a women’s craft, both appeal to Alexandra.

“I’ve always loved the idea of passing down useful things, like textiles, and how textiles really capture the feeling of the era.

Earthy, muted tones are a signature of Daughter Handwovens, and Alexandra positions her products as heirloom-quality goods. While the aesthetic of pieces reflects current trends, these handmade products are part of a long legacy. Alexandra relates a story of being asked by a Viking re-enactor to create authentic Viking belts. To fulfill the commission she researched patterns appropriate to the era and taught herself to weave using weaving cards, tools that would have been made of stone or wood in ancient times.

Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern

The current popularity of the handmade marketplace has been a boon to Alexandra’s business, allowing her to price her work according to its value.

“The world today is more appreciative of handmade goods,” she says.

The potential for self-sufficiency of weaving is also important to Daughter Handwovens. Alexandra works primarily with cotton and linen, both plant-based fibers, which allows her work to be vegan-friendly and free of allergens. She is teaching herself to spin her own cotton, and eventually wants to dye the fibers herself, with the goal of taking cotton from the plant to the finished product, allowing them to be completely sustainable.

Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern