Beet Hummus with Veggies

This recipe for Beet Hummus with Veggies originally appeared in the Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern. to see the full feature in which it appeared, Brunch In Bloom, along with tons of other spring inspiration, including spring fashion featuring the illustrations of Kristie Duncan, a guide on how to begin a lifelong art collection, botanic-infused wellness recipes to reinvigorate your hair and scalp after a long winter, and much more, order a back copy of our Spring 2018 issue now.

Beet Hummus Recipe | Spring Hummus Recipe | Pink Hummus | Easy Hummus Recipe | Beet Hummus without Chickpeas | Beet Hummus without Tahini | Ideas for Beets | Ideas for Cooking with Beets | Fun Spring Food | Food Photography | Paprika Southern

Beet Hummus with Veggies Recipe

Recipe by Kim Daniels / Photographed by Siobhan Egan / Styled by Bevin Valentine Jalbert

Ingredients

  • 1 medium sized beet

  • 1 15 oz. can white beans, such as canellini, drained 

  • Juice of one lemon

  • Salt and ground pepper, to taste

  • 2 cloves of garlic, chopped

  • 2 tsp. ground cumin

  • 1/2 cup tahini paste

  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil 

  • 1/4 cup Greek yogurt

  • Sesame seeds

  • Fresh herbs, such as thyme or flat leaf parsley

  • Chopped veggies, to serve

Directions

Preheat oven to 425°F. Wash and trim beet. Rub with olive oil and wrap in aluminum foil. Roast in oven for 45-60 minutes, or until beet is tender. Cool completely and chop into chunks. 

In a food processor, combine beans, chunks of beets, lemon juice, garlic, cumin, and Tahini. Combine until smooth. Slowly drizzle in olive oil. 

To serve, swirl Greek yogurt over the top of the hummus. Top with fresh herbs, such as thyme or flat leaf parsley, and sesame seeds, and serve with fresh chopped veggies.

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Paprika Southern is a quarterly print publication inspiring creative and intentional living. See this recipe and much more when you order the Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern, or become a subscriber to entitle you to a full year of seasonal inspiration and creative ideas to inspire your everyday.

DIY Botanic Hair and Scalp Care

This piece, Spring Refresh: DIY Botanic Hair and Scalp Care, originally appeared in the Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern. To see this full feature in print, along with our tips on how to begin a lifelong art collection, an exploration of the legacy of iconic southern photographer Jack Leigh, a floral and citrus-infused brunch with recipes, and much more, order a back issue now.

Spring Refresh

DIY Botanic Hair and Scalp Care

Recipes by Chelsea Kester / Photographed by Siobhan Egan

In a world of complexity, busy schedules, and an overwhelming amount of beauty products, sometimes we need to return to our roots and create more simple self-care routines. Spring is the perfect season to align our beauty regimens with new and fresh botanical treatments and to awaken our tired winter bodies. Most of what you’ll need can be found in your pantry or at your local health food store. Let your curiosity and sense of wonder walk you through these three simple, effective hair and scalp treatments.

DIY Botanic Hair and Scalp Treatment | DIY Hair Care | DIY Hair Treatment | For Oily Hair | For Oily Scalp | Oily Hair Remedies | Clean Beauty Hair Care | At-Home Hair Treatment | Botanic Hair Treatment | Natural Hair Treatment | Oily Hair Treatment | Oily Hair Mask | Natural Hair Mask | DIY Hair Mask | Balancing Hair Treatment | Hair Treatment for Growth | Lemon, Apple Cider, Vinegar, Hibiscus Tea | Wildflower Gypsy | Paprika Southern

Oil Slick Treatment

Lemon, Apple Cider, Vinegar, and Hibiscus Tea

Oily, limp hair can be caused by numerous factors including poor product usage or build up, hormones, stress and environmental factors. For a simple oil balancing treatment you’ll need to gather 1 organic lemon, apple cider vinegar with the “mother” and organic hibiscus tea or loose hibiscus leaves.

  • Steep 1 tea bag of hibiscus in 1 cup of hot water; you may double this for longer hair.

  • Once steeped and strained, add 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar and the juice from half of a lemon. Again, double this if you have longer hair.

  • Let your rinse cool and then pour into a shower-safe bottle or bowl.

  • After shampooing your hair, apply the Hibiscus Tea Blend to wet hair and leave in for 5-7 minutes. Gently rinse out with cool water and condition if necessary.

Hibiscus petals are vital for hair and scalp health and strength, and can encourage hair growth. The astringent nature of the lemon juice helps remove product build up and has astringent effect on scalp oil production.  Apple cider vinegar helps soften, detangle and add luster to dull strands. The vinegar scent will dissipate after your hair dries. Repeat this treatment monthly, or as needed.

DIY Botanic Hair and Scalp Treatment | DIY Hair Care | DIY Hair Treatment | For Dry Hair | For Dry Scalp | Dry Hair Remedies | Clean Beauty Hair Care | At-Home Hair Treatment | Botanic Hair Treatment | Natural Hair Treatment | Dry Hair Treatment | Dry Hair Mask | Natural Hair Mask | DIY Hair Mask | Balancing Hair Treatment | Hair Treatment for Frizzy Hair | Spring Hair Treatment | Hydrating Hair Treatment | Hydrating Hair Mask | Hemp Seed Oil, Sunflower Oil, Honey | Wildflower Gypsy | Paprika Southern

Thirsty Hair Treatment

Hemp Seed Oil, Sunflower Oil, Honey

Recovering from dry, frazzled winter hair can be a bit of a challenge. Thankfully, your pantry or local grocery store has some simple items to help bring life back into your hair and scalp. You will need raw honey (local is best!) and hemp seed and sunflower oil from the cooking section of your local market.

  • Using a ceramic or glass bowl, add 1/4 cup organic sunflower oil and 2 tablespoons organic hemp seed oil. Reduce or increase amount based on your hair length.

  • Drizzle in your raw, liquid honey. Start out with 1 tablespoon and increase as desired.

  • Gently mix all three ingredients. And don’t worry if the honey doesn’t mix with the oils fully; as long as all three ingredients end up on your hair, you’re good.

  • Before showering, apply your Honey and Oil Blend on your scalp and strands. Make sure you coat your ends well too. Pin up and leave in while you shower.

  • After 10-15 minutes, shampoo twice and follow with a conditioner if necessary. 

Honey is an impressive humectant, full of healing antimicrobial and soothing benefits. It draws moisture into your hair strands, and allows it to remain there. The combination of sunflower and hemp seed oil adds intense hydration, vitamins and healthy fatty acids, which are imperative to hair's moisture-retaining abilities and smoothness. This honey and oil treatment can be used as often as you need and tailored to your liking with various essential oils.

DIY Botanic Hair and Scalp Treatment | DIY Hair Care | DIY Hair Treatment | For Dry Hair | For Dandruff | Dry Hair Remedies | Clean Beauty Hair Care | At-Home Hair Treatment | Treatment for Hair Growth | Natural Hair Treatment | Natural Hair and Scalp Remedies | Scalp Irritation Treatments | Treatments for Thinning Hair | DIY Hair Remedies | Balancing Hair Treatment | Hair Treatment for Frizzy Hair | Spring Hair Treatment | Hydrating Hair Treatment  | Scalp Treatments for Psoriasis and Eczema | Castor Oil, Peppermint Oil, Tea Tree Oil, Rosemary, Lavender | Wildflower Gypsy | Paprika Southern

Scalp Remedies

Castor Oil, Peppermint Oil, Tea Tree Oil, Rosemary, Lavender

Lavender

Queen bee of the plant world, lavender offers a range of benefits. For scalp care, specifically dandruff and irritation, it offers soothing, healing properties, as well as fighting the fungus that causes dandruff. The scent of lavender also delivers a calming aroma, which helps with stress management and allows us to relax. Use organic lavender essential oil in a scalp blend for best results

Rosemary

We all know the bright and awakening scent of rosemary, but did you know its one of the best herbs for increasing scalp circulation? When we promote more circulation on our scalps, more blood flows to our hair follicles. Because of this, more internal nutrients are fed into the hair bulb and more hair sprouts. Some people are sensitive to rosemary, so either use the essential oil sparingly or steep fresh or dried rosemary stems in hot water to create a hair tea rinse.

Tea Tree

Dandruff has no more worse enemy than tea tree oil. Due to its intense antimicrobial benefits and sebum controlling power, tea tree essential oil puts our scalps back into balance. Add 2-3 drops of tea tree essential oil to 1 tablespoon castor oil, apply at night and shampoo out in the morning. Feel free to add other essential oils to this blend to customize as well.

Peppermint

Peppermint is one of my go-to’s for scalp irritation, itchiness or thinning hair. It’s not overpowering or medicinally scented, while still encouraging proper blood flow, cooling scalp discomfort, balancing sebum production and fighting dandruff. Anyone dealing with psoriasis or eczema would like peppermint oil, as its not as intense as rosemary or tea tree. Mix 2 drops peppermint oil with 3-4 drops lavender oil in 1 tablespoon castor oil for a scalp massage and to help loosen psoriasis or eczema flakes.

Castor Oil

Although this oil is notoriously thick and sometimes sticky, castor oil does an amazing job at encouraging hair growth and soothing irritated scalps. Due to its high levels of fatty acids, it nourishes our scalps and can even help promote longer, fuller eyelashes and eyebrows.

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Order a back copy of our Spring 2018 for much more spring inspiration!

The Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern also features a Brunch in Bloom, an article on Savannah’s iconic photographer known for the Bird-Girl image, Jack Leigh, a guide on how to build your art collection, and much more.

Each seasonal issue of Paprika Southern is filled with inspiration for creative and intentional living.

Brunch in Bloom: Floral and Citrus Brunch

Brunch in Bloom: Floral and Citrus Brunch originally appeared in the Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern. To see the complete feature, including recipes, in print, order a back copy of the Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern.

Brunch in Bloom | Floral and Citrus Brunch | Floral Place Setting | Spring Place Setting | Spring Brunch Ideas | Kumquats | Grapefruit | Citrus Table | Citrus Tablescape | Prop Styling Ideas | Food Styling Ideas | Food and Prop Styling Ideas | Spring Party | Colorful Spring Tablescape | Spring Tablescape for Round Tables | White Dishes | Orange | Pink | Paprika Southern

Brunch in Bloom

Floral and Citrus Brunch

Photography: Siobhan Egan / Styling: Bevin Valentine Jalbert / Recipes: Kim Daniels / Florals: Mea. Flowers / Location: The Stephen Williams House, Savannah, GA

This spring we’re inspired by the fresh colors and bold flavors of citrus—grapefruits, blood oranges, lemons, kumquats. A feast for the eyes in the burst of vibrance these fruits bring to the table, the zest of citrus also offers a treat for other senses. This season, try hosting a brunch that plays off these flavors with the dishes infused with both the past of citrus of color of spring blooms.

Brunch in Bloom | Floral and Citrus Brunch | Floral Place Setting | Spring Place Setting | Spring Brunch Ideas | Kumquats | Grapefruit | Citrus Table | Citrus Tablescape | Prop Styling Ideas | Food Styling Ideas | Food and Prop Styling Ideas | Spring Party | Colorful Spring Tablescape | Spring Tablescape for Round Tables | White Dishes | Orange | Pink | Paprika Southern
Brunch in Bloom | Floral and Citrus Brunch | Floral Place Setting | Spring Place Setting | Spring Brunch Ideas | Kumquats | Grapefruit | Citrus Table | Citrus Tablescape | Prop Styling Ideas | Food Styling Ideas | Food and Prop Styling Ideas | Spring Party | Colorful Spring Tablescape | Champagne Bar | Mimosa Bar | Spring Tablescape for Round Tables | White Dishes | Orange | Pink | Paprika Southern
Brunch in Bloom | Floral and Citrus Brunch | Floral Place Setting | Spring Place Setting | Spring Brunch Ideas | Kumquats | Grapefruit | Citrus Table | Citrus Tablescape | Prop Styling Ideas | Food Styling Ideas | Food and Prop Styling Ideas | Spring Party | Colorful Spring Tablescape | Champagne Bar | Mimosa Bar | Spring Tablescape for Round Tables | White Dishes | Orange | Pink | Paprika Southern
Brunch in Bloom | Floral and Citrus Brunch | Floral Place Setting | Spring Place Setting | Spring Brunch Ideas | Kumquats | Grapefruit | Citrus Table | Citrus Tablescape | Prop Styling Ideas | Food Styling Ideas | Food and Prop Styling Ideas | Spring Party | Colorful Spring Tablescape | Champagne Bar | Mimosa Bar | Spring Tablescape for Round Tables | White Dishes | Orange | Pink | Paprika Southern
Brunch in Bloom | Floral and Citrus Brunch | Floral Place Setting | Spring Place Setting | Spring Brunch Ideas | Kumquats | Grapefruit | Citrus Table | Citrus Tablescape | Prop Styling Ideas | Food Styling Ideas | Food and Prop Styling Ideas | Spring Party | Colorful Spring Tablescape | Champagne Bar | Mimosa Bar | Spring Tablescape for Round Tables | White Dishes | Orange | Pink | Paprika Southern
Brunch in Bloom | Floral and Citrus Brunch | Floral Place Setting | Spring Place Setting | Spring Brunch Ideas | Kumquats | Grapefruit | Citrus Table | Citrus Tablescape | Prop Styling Ideas | Food Styling Ideas | Food and Prop Styling Ideas | Spring Party | Colorful Spring Tablescape | Champagne Bar | Mimosa Bar | Spring Tablescape for Round Tables | White Dishes | Orange | Pink | Paprika Southern
Brunch in Bloom | Floral and Citrus Brunch | Floral Place Setting | Spring Place Setting | Spring Brunch Ideas | Kumquats | Grapefruit | Citrus Table | Citrus Tablescape | Prop Styling Ideas | Food Styling Ideas | Food and Prop Styling Ideas | Spring Party | Colorful Spring Tablescape | Champagne Bar | Mimosa Bar | Spring Tablescape for Round Tables | White Dishes | Orange | Pink | Paprika Southern
Brunch in Bloom | Floral and Citrus Brunch | Floral Place Setting | Spring Place Setting | Spring Brunch Ideas | Kumquats | Grapefruit | Citrus Table | Citrus Tablescape | Prop Styling Ideas | Food Styling Ideas | Food and Prop Styling Ideas | Spring Party | Colorful Spring Tablescape | Champagne Bar | Mimosa Bar | Spring Tablescape for Round Tables | White Dishes | Orange | Pink | Paprika Southern
Brunch in Bloom | Floral and Citrus Brunch | Floral Place Setting | Spring Place Setting | Spring Brunch Ideas | Kumquats | Grapefruit | Citrus Table | Citrus Tablescape | Prop Styling Ideas | Food Styling Ideas | Food and Prop Styling Ideas | Spring Party | Colorful Spring Tablescape | Champagne Bar | Mimosa Bar | Spring Tablescape for Round Tables | White Dishes | Orange | Pink | Paprika Southern
Brunch in Bloom | Floral and Citrus Brunch | Floral Place Setting | Spring Place Setting | Spring Brunch Ideas | Kumquats | Grapefruit | Citrus Table | Citrus Tablescape | Prop Styling Ideas | Food Styling Ideas | Food and Prop Styling Ideas | Spring Party | Colorful Spring Tablescape | Champagne Bar | Mimosa Bar | Spring Tablescape for Round Tables | White Dishes | Orange | Pink | Paprika Southern
Brunch in Bloom | Floral and Citrus Brunch | Floral Place Setting | Spring Place Setting | Spring Brunch Ideas | Kumquats | Grapefruit | Citrus Table | Citrus Tablescape | Prop Styling Ideas | Food Styling Ideas | Food and Prop Styling Ideas | Spring Party | Colorful Spring Tablescape | Champagne Bar | Mimosa Bar | Spring Tablescape for Round Tables | White Dishes | Orange | Pink | Paprika Southern
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Botanic Spirit: Floral Hair Masterpieces with Wildflower Gypsy

This piece, Botanic Spirit: Floral Hair Masterpieces with Wildflower Gypsy, originally appeared in the Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern. To see the feature in print, plus other pieces including an exploration of the legacy of iconic southern photographer Jack Leigh, spring fashion featuring the illustrations of Kristie Duncan, and citrus-infused spring brunch inspiration, order a back copy now.

Botanic Spirit

Floral Hair Masterpieces with Wildflower Gypsy

Photography: Siobhan Egan / Hair & Floral Design: Chelsea Kester of Wildflower Gypsy / Makeup: Heather of Dollface by Jules / Florals: Everbloom, Inc. / Model: Rachel Davis

This spring hairstylist and creator of Wildflower Gypsy Chelsea Kester was inspired to create three botanical hair looks that epitomize what it means to be a free spirit. Her definition of a free spirit encapsulates a divinely feminine soul who can revel in her own natural beauty, and in this feature we paired this concept with beauty found in the natural world.

Chelsea pulled elements from flower petals, the ben of a succulent’s arm, and trailing vines of greenery to create hair looks that flow with texture and style.

Botanic Spirit | Floral Hair Masterpieces with Wildflower Gypsy | Hair Florals | Spring Hair | Flower Crown | Floral Crown | Free Spirit | Spring Beauty | Editorial Hair | Editorial Hair Ideas | Stargazer lilies | Spring Roses | Ranunculus | Paprika Southern

Bloom Riot

Nature paints her own masterpiece with Stargazer lilies, spring roses, and ranunculus.

Botanic Spirit | Floral Hair Masterpieces with Wildflower Gypsy | Hair Florals | Spring Hair | Flower Crown | Floral Crown | Free Spirit | Spring Beauty | Editorial Hair | Editorial Hair Ideas | Succulents | Thistles | Eucalyptus Pods | Paprika Southern

Shades of Spring

Succulents, thistles, and eucalyptus pods accent softly flowing waves in a celebration of tonality.

Botanic Spirit | Floral Hair Masterpieces with Wildflower Gypsy | Hair Florals | Spring Hair | Flower Crown | Floral Crown | Free Spirit | Spring Beauty | Editorial Hair | Editorial Hair Ideas | Spring Greenery | Kangaroo Paws | Chocolate Queen Anne’s Lace | Paprika Southern

Green Crush

Spring greenery, kangaroo paws, and chocolate Queen Anne’s Lace entwine with braids to create a feminine, crowning glory.

Spring 2018
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The Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern feature:

-The photographic legacy of Jack Leigh
-Fairy-tale spring fashion featuring the illustrations of Kristie Duncan
-Floral spring beauty for the free spirit
-How to build a lifelong art collection
-Floral- and citrus-infused inspiration and recipes for spring
And more!

Printed in the USA, 64 pages including cover, 8.5" x 11".

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Subscribe to Paprika Southern for one year to receive more than 15% off the news stand price and discounted shipping!

Your subscription will begin with the Fall 2018 issue.

Your magazine will ship quarterly via USPS.

Please note that you will be charged the full amount of your subscription upon ordering.

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Creative South: Daughter Handwovens

In each issue of Paprika Southern we feature three creatives living and working in the South in our Creative South section. This section is dedicated to highlighting both emerging and established makers, artists, and entrepreneurs who are doing innovative and exciting things in the South.

This article about the creator of Daughter Handwovens, Alexandra Forby, was originally published in the print edition of Paprika Southern Spring 2018. To see the article in print, along with an exploration of the photographic legacy of southern photographer Jack Leigh, our tips on how to begin a lifelong art collection, a spring brunch menu with recipes, and much more, order a back issue of the Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern.

Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern

Daughter Handwovens

Written by Bevin Valentine Jalbert / Photographed by Siobhan Egan

In Alexandra Forby’s Savannah studio, strands of cotton and linen are woven together in intricate patterns to form throw pillows, tea towels, and other handwoven goods. The sound of the 36-inch, four-shaft loom that Alexandra operates resounds in organized cacophony and the process is surprisingly physical.

Weaving is an ancient art, and Alexandra, owner of Daughter Handwovens, loves the tradition it represents.

“So much of this is based in awesome references to weaving in the Bible,” she explains, “and women who work with their hands…Proverbs 31 is a woman who considers a field and buys it. She’s progressing her home. She’s making all of the things for her home.”

Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern

Proverbs 31 also serves as the inspiration for the name of her business. After graduating from Savannah College of Art and Design in 2013 with a BFA in painting, Alexandra, who had always dabbled in fibers art, eventually found her way to weaving, starting Daughter Handwovens in 2016. Though the business is young her work has been well-received at craft fairs and on Etsy, and over the 2017 holiday season she sold every scarf she made.

The hand-weaving process requires patience. It takes two days to set up the loom for a project. Though she can do multiple pieces once the loom is set up, a scarf, for example, takes about four hours to weave.

Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern

The ancient nature of weaving, as well as its tradition as a women’s craft, both appeal to Alexandra.

“I’ve always loved the idea of passing down useful things, like textiles, and how textiles really capture the feeling of the era.

Earthy, muted tones are a signature of Daughter Handwovens, and Alexandra positions her products as heirloom-quality goods. While the aesthetic of pieces reflects current trends, these handmade products are part of a long legacy. Alexandra relates a story of being asked by a Viking re-enactor to create authentic Viking belts. To fulfill the commission she researched patterns appropriate to the era and taught herself to weave using weaving cards, tools that would have been made of stone or wood in ancient times.

Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern
Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern

The current popularity of the handmade marketplace has been a boon to Alexandra’s business, allowing her to price her work according to its value.

“The world today is more appreciative of handmade goods,” she says.

The potential for self-sufficiency of weaving is also important to Daughter Handwovens. Alexandra works primarily with cotton and linen, both plant-based fibers, which allows her work to be vegan-friendly and free of allergens. She is teaching herself to spin her own cotton, and eventually wants to dye the fibers herself, with the goal of taking cotton from the plant to the finished product, allowing them to be completely sustainable.

Daughter Handwovens | Alexandra Forby | Savannah Maker | Southern Maker | Loom Weaving | Handwaving | Artist Studio | Home Decor | Studio Decor Ideas | Maker Studio | Maker Workspace | Craft | Textiles Art | Fibers Art | Women Entrepeneurs | Women Makers | Creative Entrepreneurs | Paprika Southern

How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection

This is a condensed version of Piece by Piece: How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection, which appeared in the Spring 2018 print issue of Paprika Southern. To see the full article, plus an exploration of the photographic legacy of Jack Leigh, dreamy floral-inspired spring hair ideas, a citrus-infused brunch menu, and much more, you can pick up a back issue now.

How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection | Art Collecting | How to Buy Art | How to Decorate with Art | How to Collect Art | Art Collecting Ideas | Home Decor | Art Collections | Savannah, GA | Lori Judge | Leslie Lovell | Susan Laney | Contemporary Art | Contemporary Art Living Room | Contemporary Art Home | Contemporary Art Modern | Contemporary Art Painting | Contemporary Art Photography|  Folk Art | Southern Art | Paprika Southern

Piece by Piece

How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection

Written by Stephanie Tallevast / Photographed by Siobhan Egan

Through an art collection, a personal point-of-view is expressed with elegance and sophistication, and the statement it makes can be as distinctive as the individual who has amassed the works. A well-curated and thoughtfully-presented art collection can drive the aura, the style and the statement of any environment. Unlike presentations of an art museum or gallery, a personal art collection can be more of a reflection of the thoughts, the preferences and the authentic style of its owners, in a way that is spoken through the artwork, rather than primarily that of an artist, curator or gallerist. 

For the seasoned collector, ideal display logistics have most likely been executed and future acquisitions may be budgeted well in advance of the next purchasing opportunity, but for someone who is just starting out in the world of art collecting, the nuances may seem a little perplexing. Giving direction and order to a small, existing collection or even making the initial purchase to begin a collection is not as overwhelming as it may seem. With some exploration, research and planning, building an art collection is an endeavor that can result in a striking and profound, as well as deeply personal, element of an interior space. 

How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection | Art Collecting | How to Buy Art | How to Decorate with Art | How to Collect Art | Art Collecting Ideas | Home Decor | Art Collections | Savannah, GA | Lori Judge | Leslie Lovell | Susan Laney | Contemporary Art | Contemporary Art Living Room | Contemporary Art Home | Contemporary Art Modern | Contemporary Art Painting | Contemporary Art Photography| Folk Art | Southern Art | Paprika Southern

Start at Home Base

How does one begin an art collection or go from owning a few pieces to shaping a serious collection? At the outset, it is important to see what is out there and to develop personal preferences before going headfirst into purchasing. “Always be true to your tastes, first and foremost. Define your likes, dislikes, taking note of subject matter you’re drawn to, techniques, mediums, styles, particular artist, and how you feel about it,” says Leslie Lovell, owner of Roots Up Gallery in Savannah. Having an established taste in art makes the experience of collecting more impassioned.

A great way to research and define your taste is simply by visiting local galleries. Many specialize in representing regional artists. Never be afraid to browse, ask questions, and research pricing.  When Leslie and her late husband Frances Allen founded their gallery the couple focused on southern, self-taught artists, and one defining factor in opening their doors was making art approachable. She encourages everyone to discover what they love in art by browsing galleries and museums, as well as by attending local art events, such as show openings, lectures and art walks. Many of these events give attendees the opportunity to meet and talk with artists and ask questions. 

Continue reading in the Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern

How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection | Art Collecting | How to Buy Art | How to Decorate with Art | How to Collect Art | Art Collecting Ideas | Home Decor | Art Collections | Savannah, GA | Lori Judge | Leslie Lovell | Susan Laney | Contemporary Art | Contemporary Art Living Room | Contemporary Art Home | Contemporary Art Modern | Contemporary Art Painting | Contemporary Art Photography| Folk Art | Southern Art | Paprika Southern
How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection | Art Collecting | How to Buy Art | How to Decorate with Art | How to Collect Art | Art Collecting Ideas | Home Decor | Art Collections | Savannah, GA | Lori Judge | Leslie Lovell | Susan Laney | Contemporary Art | Contemporary Art Living Room | Contemporary Art Home | Contemporary Art Modern | Contemporary Art Painting | Contemporary Art Photography| Folk Art | Southern Art | Paprika Southern
How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection | Art Collecting | How to Buy Art | How to Decorate with Art | How to Collect Art | Art Collecting Ideas | Home Decor | Art Collections | Savannah, GA | Lori Judge | Leslie Lovell | Susan Laney | Contemporary Art | Contemporary Art Living Room | Contemporary Art Home | Contemporary Art Modern | Contemporary Art Painting | Contemporary Art Photography| Folk Art | Southern Art | Paprika Southern
How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection | Art Collecting | How to Buy Art | How to Decorate with Art | How to Collect Art | Art Collecting Ideas | Home Decor | Art Collections | Savannah, GA | Lori Judge | Leslie Lovell | Susan Laney | Contemporary Art | Contemporary Art Living Room | Contemporary Art Home | Contemporary Art Modern | Contemporary Art Painting | Contemporary Art Photography| Folk Art | Southern Art | Paprika Southern
How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection | Art Collecting | How to Buy Art | How to Decorate with Art | How to Collect Art | Art Collecting Ideas | Home Decor | Art Collections | Savannah, GA | Lori Judge | Leslie Lovell | Susan Laney | Contemporary Art | Contemporary Art Living Room | Contemporary Art Home | Contemporary Art Modern | Contemporary Art Painting | Contemporary Art Photography| Folk Art | Southern Art | Paprika Southern
How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection | Art Collecting | How to Buy Art | How to Decorate with Art | How to Collect Art | Art Collecting Ideas | Home Decor | Art Collections | Savannah, GA | Lori Judge | Leslie Lovell | Susan Laney | Contemporary Art | Contemporary Art Living Room | Contemporary Art Home | Contemporary Art Modern | Contemporary Art Painting | Contemporary Art Photography| Folk Art | Southern Art | Paprika Southern

Combining Art, Heart, and Smarts

Savannah art patron and collector Lori Judge is a testament to how the acquisition of a single piece of art can grow into an impressive collection with purpose and presence. Her love of art and artists began when she moved to Savannah in 2000. Soon after Lori acquired an original print (actually bartering for it) from a Savannah College of Art and Design printmaking student.  She says she still has as much of a connection with the work today as she did the first day she saw the work. That print (pictured above) began her journey as a collector.

As Lori continued to collect, she became more passionate about art. At first, she just enjoyed the process of discovery and acquisition, with no specific plans for her collection. In 2002, Lori began attending the international art fair Art Basel in Miami. The exposure to the art world in such an extended view eventually generated the notion that she herself could open her collection to share with her community. The idea for The Judge Realty Permanent Art Collection was born. Lori has curated and displayed much of her art in the Judge Realty office, located in the Savannah Historic District, for public viewing. 

After additional acquisitions, Lori realized that many of her pieces had themes of economy, energy and the environment, issues already of interest and importance to her. Thus, a focus for the collection emerged. Lori utilized the services of Susan Laney, owner of Laney Contemporary Fine Art, to help her catalog, organize, and display her pieces. The process of working with Susan as a consultant helped to create some long-range planning and thoughtful insight into her collection. Susan assisted with display and proper records for all of Lori’s collected works.

Continue reading in the Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern

How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection | Art Collecting | How to Buy Art | How to Decorate with Art | How to Collect Art | Art Collecting Ideas | Home Decor | Art Collections | Savannah, GA | Lori Judge | Leslie Lovell | Susan Laney | Contemporary Art | Contemporary Art Living Room | Contemporary Art Home | Contemporary Art Modern | Contemporary Art Painting | Contemporary Art Photography| Folk Art | Southern Art | Paprika Southern
How to Begin a Lifelong Art Collection | Art Collecting | How to Buy Art | How to Decorate with Art | How to Collect Art | Art Collecting Ideas | Home Decor | Art Collections | Savannah, GA | Lori Judge | Leslie Lovell | Susan Laney | Contemporary Art | Contemporary Art Living Room | Contemporary Art Home | Contemporary Art Modern | Contemporary Art Painting | Contemporary Art Photography| Folk Art | Southern Art | Paprika Southern

Best Practices

At the addition of each new piece of art, proper record-keeping and display are vital. Susan Laney, owner of Laney Contemporary in Savannah, stresses the importance of documentation. She suggests making a template form for all works in a collection and recording information such as artist, title, date of the work, medium, size, where purchased, current location, and so on. Susan says it is best to enter this information into a database and to make a hard copy to keep in a file (along with the certificate of authenticity, if available). 

Another practice Susan suggests is photographing every piece in a collection, either professionally or non-professionally, depending on the level of your inventory. In addition to keeping records for each work in a database and in a file, Susan suggests having them secured on the back the frame of the work to serve as an information backup. A good framer should be able to attach a document pocket to the back of most framing at your request. 

The effort made to catalog helps give provenance and validity to your art. Susan notes, “Once a collection is properly cataloged and evaluated, it then becomes apparent if additional professional services will be needed.” This includes appraisers, restorationists, or insurance specialists. The entire cataloging project can easily be the do-it-yourself kind, but should time constraints or the need for a trained-eye be a factor, professional consultants can be hired to assist with the job. 

Continue reading in the Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern

The Bottom Line of Collecting

Leslie Lovell, Lori Judge, and Susan Laney all agree: buy only what you love! In the end, that’s what collecting is all about. Sometimes, other factors creep in to a buying decision, but Lori advises, “If you don’t love it, don’t buy it.” 

Remember, the pieces in a collection give back in very specific ways each day. Be sure that you have researched enough to have an understanding of that connection. As Leslie reminds, “Have fun and choose things that speak to you, because these pieces are going to surround you.” A new collector may not fully understand how a well-selected work of art can enhance their life for as long as they own it, but it is one of the greatest joys of collecting. Susan sums it up, saying “Even if your taste changes, for the most part the real love that you have for a piece is a forever thing.” Yes, a forever thing: such is the love of art.

Top Tips

Lori Judge

  • Explore art galleries or attend art shows. It is important to educate yourself about what is being created.

  • Set a budget every year. This is a practical way to make your collection grow.

  • Don’t be afraid to negotiate. Not all pricing is up for discussion, but often you can work out something satisfactory to all parties, especially on major purchases.

Leslie Lovell

  • Become a part of your community’s art events to help develop your own taste, preferences, and knowledge in art.

  • Don’t follow trends in art; buy only what you truly love. 

  • Use art talks and show openings as an opportunity to get to know artists personally. Forging a relationship with an artist can deepen your appreciation for their work.

Susan Laney

  • Make the investment of time to catalog your collection. Turn to a professional if you need help in this task.

  • Find a framer who understands fine art and who can collaborate with you to best showcase your collection.

  • Don’t buy art purely as a financial investment; think of it instead as an investment in your quality of life and in your community.


#1 Tip from Lori, Leslie, & Susan:

Buy only what you love!

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Read the full article, plus much more inspiration for creative and intentional living in the Spring 2018 issue of Paprika Southern!